Celebrity dating match

The game featured contestants trying to come up with answers to fill-in-the-blank questions, with the object being to match answers given by celebrity panelists.The Match Game in its original version ran on NBC's daytime lineup from 1962 until 1969.In 1963, NBC cancelled the series with six weeks left to be recorded.

Although the series still did well in the ratings (despite the popularity of ABC's horror-themed soap opera Dark Shadows), it was cancelled in 1969 along with other games in a major daytime programming overhaul, being replaced by Letters to Laugh-In which, although a spin-off of the popular prime time series Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, ended in just three months, on December 26.In addition, many of the frequent panelists on the early episodes were not regulars later in the series but had appeared on the 1960s version, including Klugman, Arlene Francis, and Bert Convy, the last of whom was later chosen as host of the show's 1990 revival before being diagnosed with a brain tumor which eventually took his life.However, the double entendre in the question "Johnny always put butter on his _____" marked a turning point in the questions on the show.It returned to ABC in a weekly prime time edition on June 26, 2016, running as an off-season replacement series.All of these revivals used the 1970s format as their basis, with varying modifications.Very few episodes of the 1960s The Match Game survive (see episode status below).In the early 1970s, CBS vice president Fred Silverman began overhauling the network's programming as part of what has colloquially become known as the rural purge.Concurrently with the weekday run, from 1975 to 1981, a once-a-week fringe time version, Match Game PM, was also offered in syndication for airing just before prime time hours.Match Game returned to NBC in 1983 as part of a sixty-minute hybrid series with Hollywood Squares, then saw a daytime run on ABC in 1990 and another for syndication in 1998; each of these series lasted one season.The success of The New Price Is Right prompted Silverman to commission more game shows.In the summer of 1973, Mark Goodson and Bill Todman took a similar approach in adapting The Match Game by reworking the show, moving it to Los Angeles, adding more celebrities and increasing the amount of prize money that could be won (it was this show, along with The ,000 Pyramid and Three on a Match of the same time, that reintroduced five-figure payouts for the first time since the quiz show scandals of the late 1950s).

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