Radioactive dating game answers

Carbon-14 has an abundance of 1.3 parts per trillion of normal carbon, so if you know the number of carbon nuclei in an object (perhaps determined by mass and Avogadro’s number), you can multiply that number by in an artifact, such as mummy wrappings, with the normal abundance in living tissue, it is possible to determine the artifact’s age (or time since death).Carbon-14 dating can be used for biological tissues as old as 50 or 60 thousand years, but is most accurate for younger samples, since the abundance of nuclei in them is greater.

If an individual nucleus survives through that time, it still has a 50 percent chance of surviving through another half-life.

As a result, one would expect the amount of sample remaining to be approximately one eighth of the original amount.

The 129.4 g remaining is just a bit larger than one-eighth, which is sensible given a half-life of just over 20 min.(c) Label analysis shows that the unit of Becquerel is sensible, as there are 0.0735 g of carbon-11 decaying each second.

That is smaller amount than at the beginning of the hour, when This dates the material in the shroud to 1988–690 = 1300.

Our calculation is only accurate to two digits, so that the year is rounded to 1300.

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  1. Tony Mecia writes the "Cashing In" column for Credit Cards.com, answering a question every week about credit card rewards. In addition to writing "Cashing In" columns and articles for Credit Cards.com, Mecia writes for a variety of trade and general-interest publications and companies.